The Countryside About Us October 1998

posted 2 Oct 2018, 01:11 by Chris Hoare
By October many of the arable fields have already taken on their winter cloaks of brown. It seems that no sooner are the fields golden with the pending cereal harvest than they convert once again to the brown newly turned soil. Much like everything in modern agriculture be it beast or, to a lesser extent, field, a barren period means eventually lost profits. Therefore it is vital to achieve a quick turn around. No sooner has a sow given birth to her litter, probably less than only 60 days later arrangements are put in hand for the process to begin all over again.  The broilers chickens, that provide those chicken breasts you enjoy, were less than 50 days old when they were “harvested”. This means the house in which the birds were reared can produce 6 batches in one year.  Wheat is no sooner combined and the straw bales cleared off the fields, than the next crop is drilled.  If it is to be oil seed rape, within a few days it will be direct drilled into the wheat stubble.  Even some of the traditional spring crops, such as peas, are being trialed with winter sowing. Of course in China two crops of rice are harvested in one season so one can conclude the urgency is truly international.

Your thoughts may just be turning about now, to that age old country pursuit of blackberrying. Of course supermarkets seem to have taken the “season” out of fruit altogether. If you would like “fresh” strawberries on Christmas Day, so be it. Plums of one variety or another are available year round.   It is understandable therefore that gathering blackberries with all the scratchy hazards that go with this activity, might just lose the appeal it once had. However, if there are those amongst us, and I confess to being one, who still enjoys the quietness of a Suffolk hedgerow and the satisfaction of gathering a rather tasty dessert, then now is the time! The early indications suggest a good crop. In fact the freedom from late frosts this year, coupled with rain at the right time, has produced an abundance of various fruits. Not least the old fashioned yellow Marabelle plum which is Victoria plum like in taste. Our tree was laden this year, the first time for ages.
On the way to Brandeston, just beyond the Cretingham turn, there is a paddock in which lives Susie, a very ancient donkey. Her field is bounded on the roadside by that attractive shrub, the snowberry. This small white berry, appearing in August, is in such contrast to everything else along the   way, so they readily catch the eye.

Roger Sykes
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