The Countryside About Us January 1999

posted 28 Dec 2018, 01:49 by Chris Hoare

The daylight is perceptibly increasing now. Could it be the sombre greyness of winter is yielding to the brighter days of Springtime? The early small leaves of the honeysuckle suggest it, and so do the snowdrops. There is a great temptation in January both on the farm or in the garden (or even mother nature herself) to “get on”. But do make haste slowly! During the next few weeks harsh weather can descend upon us from the East! Better to get down to maintenance or some tidying up in those areas which you have promised yourself to tackle but somehow don’t get around to doing it. In the garden however, as impressive as a neat orderly appearance is, one small area left to itself undisturbed with perhaps a few logs for cover, can provide a good refuge for insect life and other small hibernating creatures. Newts, for example, leave their pond environment in late autumn and spend the next few months hidden under some friendly rotting debris. You might be lucky enough to provide shelter for a slow worm who also sleeps the winter away.

Not all the countryside about us slips into a lower gear. Indeed for some a much higher gear is engaged. Such was the case recently. I was alerted by my pony’s great interest in the activity in what is usually a peaceful and empty meadow nearby. She and I were both excited to see the horses owned by a local owner, whose animals’ winter season is spent jumping hurdles at race meetings all over the country, exercising with their jockeys “up”. I expect their usual “gallops “ at Worlingworth were rather too muddy and the need to keep horses fit for racing brought them to Earl Soham in what are their normal rest and grazing fields.

Something in a very much faster gear than those is not an infrequent visitor to our countryside albeit high above it. Making its presence felt by a ferocious sound but often invisible, the F15 Eagles piloted by our young American friends from Lakenheath, perform their war dance in the blue beyond. Such is the thunder of their jet engines, that I have heard cock pheasants “squawk” their alarm call, just in the same way as when they hear thunder.

Why not, I thought , utilize modern technology to benefit our indigenous wild life? The mobile telephone masts are often sited in quiet rural places. Fix an RSPB approved owl box on them and you would have an ideal home for a barn owl. This would compensate for the loss of the old barns they used to nest in, many of which are now converted for “nests” of another kind!

Roger Sykes


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